John Algeo's British or American English?: A Handbook of Word and Grammar PDF

By John Algeo

ISBN-10: 0511242069

ISBN-13: 9780511242069

ISBN-10: 0511607245

ISBN-13: 9780511607240

ISBN-10: 0521371376

ISBN-13: 9780521371377

ISBN-10: 0521379938

ISBN-13: 9780521379939

Audio system of British and American English show a few awesome transformations of their use of grammar. during this unique survey, John Algeo considers questions corresponding to: •Who lives on a road, and who lives in a road? •Who takes a bathtub, and who has a tub? •Who says Neither do I, and who says Nor do I? •After 'thank you', who says on no account and who says you are welcome? •Whose crew are at the ball, and whose staff isn't really? Containing wide quotations from real-life English on each side of the Atlantic, gathered during the last two decades, this can be a transparent and hugely geared up consultant to the variations - and the similarities - among the grammar of British and American audio system. Written for people with no previous wisdom of linguistics, it indicates how those grammatical adjustments are associated in general to specific phrases, and offers an obtainable account of up to date English in use.

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British or American English?: A Handbook of Word and Grammar by John Algeo PDF

Audio system of British and American English exhibit a few remarkable adjustments of their use of grammar. during this special survey, John Algeo considers questions equivalent to: •Who lives on a highway, and who lives in a highway? •Who takes a bathtub, and who has a tub? •Who says Neither do I, and who says Nor do I?

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Additional info for British or American English?: A Handbook of Word and Grammar Patterns (Studies in English Language)

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4 iptmw of ’ve not the/a/any in British texts and none in American texts. > 1982 Lynn and Jay 123. 2 of ’d no in American texts. > 1986 Knox 48. 20 Parts of Speech ’d not Didn’t have: The construction is rare. < . . > 1997 popular fiction CIC. 9). > 1985 Benedictus 90–1. 2 iptmw of this form in British texts and none in American texts. < . . > 1987 May 10 (Scotland) Sunday Post 33/2. In British use, not sometimes contracts with have, whereas American use strongly favors its contraction with the auxiliary do.

Had got? <. . > 1987 Mar. 22 Sunday Times 4/7. have/has/had? 2003 James 195. > 2003 June 20 Times 40/4. > 2003 James 178. hadn’t got <. . > 1991 Dickinson 275. > 1985 Byatt 164. > 1989 Dickinson 85. have/has not got 2004 Dec. 13 Times 21/4. > 1955 Tolkien 216. > 1940 Shute 140. had got to 1984 Gilbert 184. > (American typist wrote “you have to be” for “you’ve got to be”) 1991 Dickinson 11. ’d got to < . . > 1991 Feb. 3 Sunday Times 2/4.

Have/has/had? 2003 James 195. > 2003 June 20 Times 40/4. > 2003 James 178. hadn’t got <. . > 1991 Dickinson 275. > 1985 Byatt 164. > 1989 Dickinson 85. have/has not got 2004 Dec. 13 Times 21/4. > 1955 Tolkien 216. > 1940 Shute 140. had got to 1984 Gilbert 184. > (American typist wrote “you have to be” for “you’ve got to be”) 1991 Dickinson 11. ’d got to < . . > 1991 Feb. 3 Sunday Times 2/4. have to? ), have is not favored as an operator in either British or American, but it is more often used in British (Johansson 1979, 209).

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British or American English?: A Handbook of Word and Grammar Patterns (Studies in English Language) by John Algeo


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